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Swampyville's - You're the Poet! by Swamptown
Family, Friends, Community
Feb 08, 2011 | 51067 views | 0 0 comments | 38 38 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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Swampyille's - FDR's Second New Deal!
by Swamptown
Sep 12, 2011 | 164 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Ask the Politially Correct!

Question?

What was FDR's Second New Deal?

Politically Correct Resolution:

During the depression years while the United States had a 25%

unemployment rate, the government was paying the larger farmers

not to grow crops to creat a world wide demand for agricultural

products. While many Americans were starving, the international

financial community was investing in Germany's (Nazi) rearmament.

In fact one of the investors, Henry Ford, was instrumental in

having a factory in Germany that built tanks for the Nazi's.

In the 1930's while Americans starved, the German people,

under Hitler, with Investments (seed money) from the international

financial community suffered little from the Depression years.

The "second" New Deal (1935-40s) aimed at restoring the economy

from the bottom up (History 1302)!

The "second" New Deal attempted to end the Depression by spending

at the bottom of the economy where government funds attempted to

turn non-consumers into consumers again.  Many of the programs lasted

only until World War II while others became permanent fixtures in

American life. The Works Progress Administration was a huge

federal jobs program that sought to hire unemployed breadwinners for

the purpose of strengthening their family's well-being as well as boosting

consumer demand.  The jobs varied but consisted of mainly of construction

of public roads, buildings and parks.  Over the course of its

life (1935-43) over eight million Americans worked on WPA projects.  

This was "counter-cyclical demand management" on a huge scale.

The 1935 Social Security Act set

up a modest worker-funded but federally-guaranteed pension system.  Not

on the princely scale that had had advocated, nevertheless, Social

Security (at the time) did act as a safety net for a few older workers,

promoted increased some consumer demand and earned a place as a fixture on

the American political and social landscape.

Finally, another significant component of the "second" New Deal was the

National Labor Relations Act of 1935.  Usually called the Wagner Act after

its sponsor, Senator Robert Wagner of New York, this law attempted to prevent

employer's use of intimidation and coercion in breaking up unions.  It set

up the National Labor Relations Board to guarantee the right of collective

bargaining for American workers.   The results were immediately discernable: 

the formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations whose auto worker

and coal miner units soon saw their wages increase significantly.  Again,

higher wages among the masses of the working class is an example of the

"second" New Deal's attempt to restore the economy from the bottom up.

Assessing the legacy

World War II ended both the temporary New Deal programs and the Depression

they were attempting to cure. Keep in mind that many facets of the New

Deal--Social Security, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the

Securities and Exchange Commission to name only three--have remained

in American life from the 1930s until the present. 

War ended the Depression simply because of increased government spending,

an intensified version of what Roosevelt was already doing with the WPA

and similar programs..  Responding to the external threats posed by the

Axis Powers (Germany, Japan and Italy) Roosevelt and the Congress threw

fiscal caution to the wind and spent what was necessary to win the war. 

In so doing, they also achieved pre-Depression levels of employment and

prosperity.

What then is the legacy of the New Deal as a whole?  Would it have ended

the Depression? The best answer to that is that it went a long way toward

alleviating the worst suffering of the Depression while still being captive

to the conventional thinking (political, fiscal, racial) of the day. One

cannot answer the question of whether it could have ended the Depression

based on historical facts.  World War II interrupted the process.

What are the other long-term consequences of the Depression and New Deal? 

The rise of the "Roosevelt Coalition" of farmers, union members, working

class people, Northern blacks and liberals made the Democratic Party the

nation's dominant party for almost sixty years.  Further, the political

consensus that developed after World War II held that never again should

the government allow another depression to take hold.  Thus, there followed

an unprecedented level of federal economic intervention.   This huge

expansion in the role, size and power of government in American social

and economic life is aptly summed up in Republican President Richard Nixon's

famous 1971 remark, "We're all Keynesians now." (History 1302)

Basically the "Keynesians Theory" was spend your way to prosperity. The

same theory that is being used today! It didn't work then and it won't

work now! That is, if the special interests are allowed to get their

sticky fingers in what is left of the "American Pie"!

"How fortunate for governments that the people they administer to don't

think"! (Adolf Hitler)

"MEMORES ACTI PRUDENTES FUTURI"

(Mindful of what has been done, aware of what will be)

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Swampyville's - FDR's Second New Deal!
by Swamptown
Sep 12, 2011 | 160 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Ask the Politially Correct!

Question?

What was FDR's Second New Deal?

Politically Correct Resolution:

During the depression years while the United States had a 25%

unemployment rate, the government was paying the larger farmers

not to grow crops to creat a world wide demand for agricultural

products. While many Americans were starving, the international

financial community was investing in Germany's (Nazi) rearmament.

In fact one of the investors, Henry Ford, was instrumental in

having a factory in Germany that built tanks for the Nazi's.

In the 1930's while Americans starved, the German people,

under Hitler, with Investments (seed money) from the international

financial community suffered little from the Depression years.

The "second" New Deal (1935-40s) aimed at restoring the economy

from the bottom up (History 1302)!

The "second" New Deal attempted to end the Depression by spending

at the bottom of the economy where government funds attempted to

turn non-consumers into consumers again.  Many of the programs lasted

only until World War II while others became permanent fixtures in

American life. The Works Progress Administration was a huge

federal jobs program that sought to hire unemployed breadwinners for

the purpose of strengthening their family's well-being as well as boosting

consumer demand.  The jobs varied but consisted of mainly of construction

of public roads, buildings and parks.  Over the course of its

life (1935-43) over eight million Americans worked on WPA projects.  

This was "counter-cyclical demand management" on a huge scale.

The 1935 Social Security Act set

up a modest worker-funded but federally-guaranteed pension system.  Not

on the princely scale that had had advocated, nevertheless, Social

Security (at the time) did act as a safety net for a few older workers,

promoted increased some consumer demand and earned a place as a fixture on

the American political and social landscape.

Finally, another significant component of the "second" New Deal was the

National Labor Relations Act of 1935.  Usually called the Wagner Act after

its sponsor, Senator Robert Wagner of New York, this law attempted to prevent

employer's use of intimidation and coercion in breaking up unions.  It set

up the National Labor Relations Board to guarantee the right of collective

bargaining for American workers.   The results were immediately discernable: 

the formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations whose auto worker

and coal miner units soon saw their wages increase significantly.  Again,

higher wages among the masses of the working class is an example of the

"second" New Deal's attempt to restore the economy from the bottom up.

Assessing the legacy

World War II ended both the temporary New Deal programs and the Depression

they were attempting to cure. Keep in mind that many facets of the New

Deal--Social Security, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the

Securities and Exchange Commission to name only three--have remained

in American life from the 1930s until the present. 

War ended the Depression simply because of increased government spending,

an intensified version of what Roosevelt was already doing with the WPA

and similar programs..  Responding to the external threats posed by the

Axis Powers (Germany, Japan and Italy) Roosevelt and the Congress threw

fiscal caution to the wind and spent what was necessary to win the war. 

In so doing, they also achieved pre-Depression levels of employment and

prosperity.

What then is the legacy of the New Deal as a whole?  Would it have ended

the Depression? The best answer to that is that it went a long way toward

alleviating the worst suffering of the Depression while still being captive

to the conventional thinking (political, fiscal, racial) of the day. One

cannot answer the question of whether it could have ended the Depression

based on historical facts.  World War II interrupted the process.

What are the other long-term consequences of the Depression and New Deal? 

The rise of the "Roosevelt Coalition" of farmers, union members, working

class people, Northern blacks and liberals made the Democratic Party the

nation's dominant party for almost sixty years.  Further, the political

consensus that developed after World War II held that never again should

the government allow another depression to take hold.  Thus, there followed

an unprecedented level of federal economic intervention.   This huge

expansion in the role, size and power of government in American social

and economic life is aptly summed up in Republican President Richard Nixon's

famous 1971 remark, "We're all Keynesians now." (History 1302)

Basically the "Keynesians Theory" was spend your way to prosperity. The

same theory that is being used today! It didn't work then and it won't

work now! That is, if the special interests are allowed to get their

sticky fingers in what is left of the "American Pie"!

"How fortunate for governments that the people they administer to don't

think"! (Adolf Hitler)

"MEMORES ACTI PRUDENTES FUTURI"

(Mindful of what has been done, aware of what will be)

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view/post comments
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Swampyville's - FDR's First New Deal!
by Swamptown
Sep 05, 2011 | 246 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was "Born to the Manor" on his

Family's Pantation! He was provided everything he ever wanted!

There are two types of Plantation Owners, malevolent or

benevolent. The malevolent owner physically and mentally

abuses his slaves, while the benevolent owner takes care

of his slaves by providing them with food, clothing and

shelter. By doing so, the benevolent plantation owner's

slaves are not apt to run away and they are a lot more

contented (dependent upon him for all their needs).  As a

member of the Plantation Owner's Association (Fictional),

FDR was elected to be their representative in 1932.

Ask the Politically Correct!

Question?

What was FDR's First New Deal during the Great Depression?

Politically Correct Resolution:

The "First" New Deal (1933-35) aimed at restoring the economy

from the "top down" (trickle down  - hmmm, sounds familiar)

(History 1302)

FDR remained vague while running for President in 1931.

He promised if he was elected, that under his presidency,

government would act decisively to end the depression.

Once he was elected, he said yes to every plan Wall Street

came up with. The Congress approved every proposal that

FDR presented to them.

The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA), passed in

1933, accepted the long-held premise that low farm

prices resulted from overproduction.  Thus, the

government sought to stimulate increased farm prices

by paying farmers to produce less.  While the original

AAA was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court,

a new act correcting for the Court's concerns was passed

in 1935.  Critics pointed out the irony of reducing food

production in a society where children already went hungry. 

Of course, those children's hunger did not represent "demand "

in the marketplace.   Indeed there were agricultural surpluses;

as usual, the problem of the American farm was demand and

distribution, not supply.   "Acreage allotment" (the backbone

of the crop reduction program) helped the largest and best

capitalized farmers.  It did little for smaller farmers and

led to the eviction and homelessness of tenants and sharecroppers

whose landlords hardly needed their services under a system that

paid them to grow less.  Further, it failed to address the

fundamental problem of the Depression:  weak consumer demand due

to falling wages and unemployment.  In the long run the effect of

the AAA was beneficial to large operators.

The 1933 National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA) set up the New

Deal's fundamental strategy of centralized planning as a means

of combating the Depression.  Industrial sectors were encouraged

to avoid "cutthroat competition" (selling below cost to attract

dwindling customers and drive weaker competitors out of business)

which may have been good for individual businesses in the short-run,

but resulted in increased unemployment and an even smaller customer

pool in the long-run.  The government temporarily suspended

enforcement of anti-monopoly laws and sponsored what amounted to

price-fixing as an emergency measure.  Similar efforts were made

to stabilize wages within industries as well.  Again, the basic

problem left unanswered was "overall weak consumer demand".   The

NIRA did address this in a limited way with the Public Works

Administration which funded various public employment schemes;

however, the number of jobs created by the PWA were miniscule

compared to the number of jobless workers.     

The "First" New Deal's Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reflected

the future liberal methods of the "Second" New Deal.  The TVA (1933)

provided millions of dollars to transform the economies of seven

depressed, rural Southern states along the Tennessee River.  The

program included dam-building, electric power-generation, flood

and erosion control.   It provided relatively high-wage jobs in

construction in a region the president called "the nation's number

one economic problem."  Critics saw creeping socialism in this

venture;  liberals saw it as a successful example of government

solving social and economic problems.

The Politics of Right and Left push and pull FDR toward

the Left

The right-wing of American politics convinced Roosevelt

he had nothing to lose on that end of the spectrum.

Chief among his critics on the right was the Liberty

League, a speaker's bureau funded by the Du Pont family

and other business interests.  The League leadership

sought to fuse a partnership between the segregationist

governor of Georgia Eugene Talmadge and other conservative

leaders to create a grassroots opposition to the New Deal.

Liberty League speakers toured the country accusing Roosevelt

of instituting creeping socialism.

Right-wing radio personality Father Charles Coughlin

denounced recipients of government assistance and claimed

the New Deal led the country toward a Communist dictatorship.

(He suggested Nazi Germany would prove to be America's correct

model) and blamed the Depression on a Jewish conspiracy (when there's

a lingering doubt give the Jews a clout).  At the height of his

popularity millions of Americans listened to his radio sermons

each week.

This was a prime example of how the media of the time was used

to propagandize the minds of the people to fulfill an agenda.

(in this case it was right wing propaganda).

The Liberty League convinced Roosevelt that he had lost any hope

of support from the business right and Coughlin's popularity

convinced him that people must be suffering indeed to listen

to such rhetoric.  In a sense, both the Liberty League and

Coughlin (for different reasons) pushed FDR further to the left.

Roosevelt was pulled toward the left by both the traditional Left

(The Socialist Party of America) and the unconventional left

(Dr. Francis Townshend and Sen. Huey P. Long of Louisiana).

In 1932 the Socialists' presidential candidate Norman Thomas had

tripled his 1928 showing as hard times rejuvenated the Socialist

critique of the system.   Nobody thought Thomas posed an electoral

threat to FDR; the president was sensitive, however, to the

Socialists' rising popularity.

Dr. Francis Townsend, a California physician, argued in favor of

a federally-funded old-age pension as a means of ending the Depression.

He argued that turning the nation's elderly population into robust

consumers would solve the underlying problem of weak demand.  Dr.

Townsend's clubs began springing up across the country as his message

of care for the elderly meshed with people's desire for a rapid end

to the Depression.    

The colorful senator from Louisiana, Huey P. Long, joined Roosevelt's

critics on the left with his "Share Our Wealth" plan.  Long proposed

a guaranteed household income for each American family paid for by high

taxes on the wealthiest Americans.  Long's rising popularity (before his

assassination in 1935) further demonstrated to FDR the discontent of the

people.   Convinced that Americans were suffering more than he had

realized and believing he had already forfeited the support of the

business right, FDR headed left in the "second" New Deal.

(History 1302)

Now we know where the phrase "I was for it before I was against it"

originally came from after FDR stuck his finger in the air to see

which way the political wind was blowing.

Make no mistake about it, the Wall Street (International) Bankers were/are

playing both sides (Left and Right) against the middle!

"NOVUS GLOBUS FUNDA"

(New Global Foundation (Plantation))

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Swampyville's - FDR's First New Deal!
by Swamptown
Sep 05, 2011 | 121 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was "Born to the Manor" on his

Family's Pantation! He was provided everything he ever wanted!

There are two types of Plantation Owners, malevolent or

benevolent. The malevolent owner physically and mentally

abuses his slaves, while the benevolent owner takes care

of his slaves by providing them with food, clothing and

shelter. By doing so, the benevolent plantation owner's

slaves are not apt to run away and they are a lot more

contented (dependent upon him for all their needs).  As a

member of the Plantation Owner's Association (Fictional),

FDR was elected to be their representative in 1932.

Ask the Politically Correct!

Question?

What was FDR's First New Deal during the Great Depression?

Politically Correct Resolution:

The "First" New Deal (1933-35) aimed at restoring the economy

from the "top down" (trickle down  - hmmm, sounds familiar)

(History 1302)

FDR remained vague while running for President in 1931.

He promised if he was elected, that under his presidency,

government would act decisively to end the depression.

Once he was elected, he said yes to every plan Wall Street

came up with. The Congress approved every proposal that

FDR presented to them.

The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA), passed in

1933, accepted the long-held premise that low farm

prices resulted from overproduction.  Thus, the

government sought to stimulate increased farm prices

by paying farmers to produce less.  While the original

AAA was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court,

a new act correcting for the Court's concerns was passed

in 1935.  Critics pointed out the irony of reducing food

production in a society where children already went hungry. 

Of course, those children's hunger did not represent "demand "

in the marketplace.   Indeed there were agricultural surpluses;

as usual, the problem of the American farm was demand and

distribution, not supply.   "Acreage allotment" (the backbone

of the crop reduction program) helped the largest and best

capitalized farmers.  It did little for smaller farmers and

led to the eviction and homelessness of tenants and sharecroppers

whose landlords hardly needed their services under a system that

paid them to grow less.  Further, it failed to address the

fundamental problem of the Depression:  weak consumer demand due

to falling wages and unemployment.  In the long run the effect of

the AAA was beneficial to large operators.

The 1933 National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA) set up the New

Deal's fundamental strategy of centralized planning as a means

of combating the Depression.  Industrial sectors were encouraged

to avoid "cutthroat competition" (selling below cost to attract

dwindling customers and drive weaker competitors out of business)

which may have been good for individual businesses in the short-run,

but resulted in increased unemployment and an even smaller customer

pool in the long-run.  The government temporarily suspended

enforcement of anti-monopoly laws and sponsored what amounted to

price-fixing as an emergency measure.  Similar efforts were made

to stabilize wages within industries as well.  Again, the basic

problem left unanswered was "overall weak consumer demand".   The

NIRA did address this in a limited way with the Public Works

Administration which funded various public employment schemes;

however, the number of jobs created by the PWA were miniscule

compared to the number of jobless workers.     

The "First" New Deal's Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reflected

the future liberal methods of the "Second" New Deal.  The TVA (1933)

provided millions of dollars to transform the economies of seven

depressed, rural Southern states along the Tennessee River.  The

program included dam-building, electric power-generation, flood

and erosion control.   It provided relatively high-wage jobs in

construction in a region the president called "the nation's number

one economic problem."  Critics saw creeping socialism in this

venture;  liberals saw it as a successful example of government

solving social and economic problems.

The Politics of Right and Left push and pull FDR toward

the Left

The right-wing of American politics convinced Roosevelt

he had nothing to lose on that end of the spectrum.

Chief among his critics on the right was the Liberty

League, a speaker's bureau funded by the Du Pont family

and other business interests.  The League leadership

sought to fuse a partnership between the segregationist

governor of Georgia Eugene Talmadge and other conservative

leaders to create a grassroots opposition to the New Deal.

Liberty League speakers toured the country accusing Roosevelt

of instituting creeping socialism.

Right-wing radio personality Father Charles Coughlin

denounced recipients of government assistance and claimed

the New Deal led the country toward a Communist dictatorship.

(He suggested Nazi Germany would prove to be America's correct

model) and blamed the Depression on a Jewish conspiracy (when there's

a lingering doubt give the Jews a clout).  At the height of his

popularity millions of Americans listened to his radio sermons

each week.

This was a prime example of how the media of the time was used

to propagandize the minds of the people to fulfill an agenda.

(in this case it was right wing propaganda).

The Liberty League convinced Roosevelt that he had lost any hope

of support from the business right and Coughlin's popularity

convinced him that people must be suffering indeed to listen

to such rhetoric.  In a sense, both the Liberty League and

Coughlin (for different reasons) pushed FDR further to the left.

Roosevelt was pulled toward the left by both the traditional Left

(The Socialist Party of America) and the unconventional left

(Dr. Francis Townshend and Sen. Huey P. Long of Louisiana).

In 1932 the Socialists' presidential candidate Norman Thomas had

tripled his 1928 showing as hard times rejuvenated the Socialist

critique of the system.   Nobody thought Thomas posed an electoral

threat to FDR; the president was sensitive, however, to the

Socialists' rising popularity.

Dr. Francis Townsend, a California physician, argued in favor of

a federally-funded old-age pension as a means of ending the Depression.

He argued that turning the nation's elderly population into robust

consumers would solve the underlying problem of weak demand.  Dr.

Townsend's clubs began springing up across the country as his message

of care for the elderly meshed with people's desire for a rapid end

to the Depression.    

The colorful senator from Louisiana, Huey P. Long, joined Roosevelt's

critics on the left with his "Share Our Wealth" plan.  Long proposed

a guaranteed household income for each American family paid for by high

taxes on the wealthiest Americans.  Long's rising popularity (before his

assassination in 1935) further demonstrated to FDR the discontent of the

people.   Convinced that Americans were suffering more than he had

realized and believing he had already forfeited the support of the

business right, FDR headed left in the "second" New Deal.

(History 1302)

Now we know where the phrase "I was for it before I was against it"

originally came from after FDR stuck his finger in the air to see

which way the political wind was blowing.

Make no mistake about it, the Wall Street (International) Bankers were/are

playing both sides (Left and Right) against the middle!

"NOVUS GLOBUS FUNDA"

(New Global Foundation (Plantation))

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Swampyville's - "Intended Consequences" - World War One!
by Swamptown
Aug 08, 2011 | 262 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

World War One (Part of the First Age of Globalization -

1890 to l918) (Second age, 1919 to 1945) (Third age, 1946 to

present), in my opinion, was a planned conflict waiting

for a reason to happen. The reason used was the assassination

of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. The real reason

for this war was the growth of "Nationalism" across

Europe, making it impossible to creat a European Union

and a Global governing power, like Woodrow Wilson's

League of Nations! (You know, that "One World Order"

thing). The United States wasn't coerced into World

War One by Wall Street and our paid for government

because of any humanitary reasons, but for Political Economic

reasons (Globalization)!

Swampyville's - Ask the Politically Correct!

Question:

What was World War One?

Politically Correct Resolution:

World War I (WWI), which was called the World War

or the Great War from its occurrence until 1939 (beginning

of World War Two), and the First World War or World War I

thereafter, was a major war centered in Europe that began on

28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. 

Eventually, It involved all the world's great powers,

which were assembled in two opposing alliances: the Allies

and the Central Powers. More than 70 million military

personnel, including 60 million Europeans, were

mobilized in one of the largest wars in history. More

than 9 million combatants were killed. This war became

one of attrition rather than for territory for both

sides (Leaders) resorted to "Trench Warfare" and never

really wanted to gain any ground.

European Unionism was spawned by the war with the breakup

of the empires, the repercussions of Germany's defeat,

and the failure of Woodrow Wilson's "League of Nations"

(with one nation refusing to join who wanted to remain

a protectionist nation - The United States) and

problems with the Treaty of Versailles are generally

agreed to be main factors in the beginning of "World War (Two)".

(In fact Woodrow Wilson prophethised?, "if his League of Nations

failed to be realized that there would be a World War (Two)

within twenty years"). Woodrow Wilson in his first term

promised the American people that he would never send

their sons into a foreign war and use this same theme

to get reelected for his second term. Immediately after

he began his second term, he persuaded Congress to declare war

on the central powers, thus plunging the U.S.into World war

One. The U.S. Congress delared war on Germany on April 6,

1917 and the Selective Service Act was passed on May 18,

1917.  The Selective Service Act was for men to go to

World War One at a young age and many never returned.

A generation of innocent young men, their heads full of

high expectations like Honour, Glory and Nation, went

off to war "to make the world safe for Democracy/the war

to end all wars" (Woodrow Wilson's words). They were slaughtered

in stupid battles planned by avariced people. Those who survived

were shocked, disillusioned and embittered by their war experiences,

and saw that their real enemy was not those that they were engaging,

but the financial interests/government at home who had lied to them.

They rejected the values of the society that had sent them

to war, a war that attempted to separate their own past

generations to one of a future New One World Order (Globalization)!

In that the First World War didn't accomplish the internationalist's

goals, a Second World War became necessary!

The World's financial interests have a simple formula for war - 

D R = P (Destruction plus Reconstruction equals Profits)!

Many of The Financial interests that financed the Central Powers

also financed the Allied Powers to wage this war. After the war,

these same financial interests also financed the reconstruction

of Europe, although there was little damage done.  All for a

huge profit! Germany finally paid off their reparations (most

for the costs of waging war) for world war one to the United

States financial interests/government in 1988.

Unfortunately for Wall Street and the U.S. Government, the United

States remained a protectionist nation and it took a Second World

war (with a severe depression between the two world wars thrown in)

to change this fact!

All of you die hard liberals and conservatives prove me wrong

without using propagandized party line talking points, they

have become trite to many of us!

"SI AL PRINCIPIO TIENES EXITO, INTENTALO, INTENTALO E

ENTENTALO DE NUEVO"! (If at first you don't succeed,

try, try and try again)

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Swampyville's - "Intended Consequencs" - World War One!
by Swamptown
Aug 08, 2011 | 118 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

World War One (Part of the First Age of Globalization -

1890 to l918) (Second age, 1919 to 1945) (Third age, 1946 to

present), in my opinion, was a planned conflict waiting

for a reason to happen. The reason used was the assassination

of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. The real reason

for this war was the growth of "Nationalism" across

Europe, making it impossible to creat a European Union

and a Global governing power, like Woodrow Wilson's

League of Nations! (You know, that "One World Order"

thing). The United States wasn't coerced into World

War One by Wall Street and our paid for government

because of any humanitary reasons, but for Political Economic

reasons (Globalization)!

Swampyville's - Ask the Politically Correct!

Question:

What was World War One?

Politically Correct Resolution:

World War I (WWI), which was called the World War

or the Great War from its occurrence until 1939 (beginning

of World War Two), and the First World War or World War I

thereafter, was a major war centered in Europe that began on

28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. 

Eventually, It involved all the world's great powers,

which were assembled in two opposing alliances: the Allies

and the Central Powers. More than 70 million military

personnel, including 60 million Europeans, were

mobilized in one of the largest wars in history. More

than 9 million combatants were killed. This war became

one of attrition rather than for territory for both

sides (Leaders) resorted to "Trench Warfare" and never

really wanted to gain any ground.

European Unionism was spawned by the war with the breakup

of the empires, the repercussions of Germany's defeat,

and the failure of Woodrow Wilson's "League of Nations"

(with one nation refusing to join who wanted to remain

a protectionist nation - The United States) and

problems with the Treaty of Versailles are generally

agreed to be main factors in the beginning of "World War (Two)".

(In fact Woodrow Wilson prophethised?, "if his League of Nations

failed to be realized that there would be a World War (Two)

within twenty years"). Woodrow Wilson in his first term

promised the American people that he would never send

their sons into a foreign war and use this same theme

to get reelected for his second term. Immediately after

he began his second term, he persuaded Congress to declare war

on the central powers, thus plunging the U.S.into World war

One. The U.S. Congress delared war on Germany on April 6,

1917 and the Selective Service Act was passed on May 18,

1917.  The Selective Service Act was for men to go to

World War One at a young age and many never returned.

A generation of innocent young men, their heads full of

high expectations like Honour, Glory and Nation, went

off to war "to make the world safe for Democracy/the war

to end all wars" (Woodrow Wilson's words). They were slaughtered

in stupid battles planned by avariced people. Those who survived

were shocked, disillusioned and embittered by their war experiences,

and saw that their real enemy was not those that they were engaging,

but the financial interests/government at home who had lied to them.

They rejected the values of the society that had sent them

to war, a war that attempted to separate their own past

generations to one of a future New One World Order (Globalization)!

In that the First World War didn't accomplish the internationalist's

goals, a Second World War became necessary!

The World's financial interests have a simple formula for war - 

D R = P (Destruction plus Reconstruction equals Profits)!

Many of The Financial interests that financed the Central Powers

also financed the Allied Powers to wage this war. After the war,

these same financial interests also financed the reconstruction

of Europe, although there was little damage done.  All for a

huge profit! Germany finally paid off their reparations (most

for the costs of waging war) for world war one to the United

States financial interests/government in 1988.

Unfortunately for Wall Street and the U.S. Government, the United

States remained a protectionist nation and it took a Second World

war (with a severe depression between the two world wars thrown in)

to change this fact!

All of you die hard liberals and conservatives prove me wrong

without using propagandized party line talking points, they

have become trite to many of us!

"SI AL PRINCIPIO TIENES EXITO, INTENTALO, INTENTALO E

ENTENTALO DE NUEVO"! (If at first you don't succeed,

try, try and try again)

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Swampyville's - "Remember the Maine"
by Swamptown
Jun 27, 2011 | 204 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Swampyville's Ask the Politically Correct!

Question:

What was the Spanish/American War?

Politically Correct Resolution:

At the ending of the nineteenth century the United State's was a

sovereign nation that wanted to maintain this status.  It was

the internationalists that called it an "Isolationist" nation,

because it didn't want to get involved in overseas conflicts.

The Spanish/American War.

(Global Building)

(Wikipedia used for most of this article)

The Spanish–American War was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the

United States. Revolts against Spanish rule had been endemic for

decades in Cuba and were closely watched by Americans; there had

been war scares before.  By 1897–98 American public opinion grew angrier

at reports of Spanish atrocities, magnified by "yellow journalism". After

the mysterious sinking of the American battleship Maine (the Catalyst) in

Havana harbor, political pressures from the Democratic Party pushed the

government headed by President William McKinley, a Republican, into a

war McKinley had wished to avoid. Compromise proved impossible, resulting

in an ultimatum sent to Madrid, which was not accepted. First Madrid,

then Washington, formally declared war.

Although the main issue was Cuban independence, the ten-week war was

fought in both the Caribbean and the Pacific. A series of one-sided

American naval and military victories followed on all fronts, owing

to their numerical superiority in most of the battles and despite the

good performance of some of the Spanish infantry units. The outcome

was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, which was favorable to the U.S. followed

by temporary American control of Cuba and indefinite colonial authority

over Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines. The defeat and subsequent

end of the Spanish Empire was a profound shock for Spain's national

psyche. The victor gained several island possessions spanning the

globe and a rancorous new debate over the wisdom of imperialism.

Thus, (the United States gained there much wanted warm water ports

to extend their World Wide influences).

American interest in Caribbean

In 1823, the Monroe Doctrine stated that further efforts by

European governments to colonize land or interfere with states

in the Americas would not be accepted by the U.S., but Spain's

colony in Cuba was exempted. In 1890 Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan

wrote The Influence of Sea Power upon History, which credits the

rise of Britain to world power to the Royal Navy. Mahan’s ideas

on projecting strength through a strong navy had a powerful

worldwide influence, especially Japan. Theodore Roosevelt, later

Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President McKinley and an

aggressive supporter of a war with Spain over Cuba, was also strongly

influenced by Mahan’s conclusions. Americans had long been interested

in Cuba (and Hawaii), since several U.S. presidents offered to purchase

it from Spain (James Polk, Franklin Pierce and Ulysses S. Grant),

and others expressed their hopes of future annexation. 

Historians debate how much Americans were interested in obtaining

an empire, while noting that the European powers had in recent

decades dramatically expanded their empires, especially in Africa

and Asia. The United States seized this opportunity to become

an international empire themselves.

Thus, began the "gradual transformation" of the United States from

one of isolationism to one of internationalism.

"UT HISPANICUS CADIT, SIC OMNIS TERRA"

(As Spain falls, so falls the whole world)

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Swampyville's - "Remember the Maine"
by Swamptown
Jun 27, 2011 | 254 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Swampyville's Ask the Politically Correct!

Question:

What was the Spanish/American War?

Politically Correct Resolution:

At the ending of the nineteenth century the United State's was a

sovereign nation that wanted to maintain this status.  It was

the internationalists that called it an "Isolationist" nation,

because it didn't want to get involved in overseas conflicts.

The Spanish/American War.

(Global Building)

(Wikipedia used for most of this article)

The Spanish–American War was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the

United States. Revolts against Spanish rule had been endemic for

decades in Cuba and were closely watched by Americans; there had

been war scares before.  By 1897–98 American public opinion grew angrier

at reports of Spanish atrocities, magnified by "yellow journalism". After

the mysterious sinking of the American battleship Maine (the Catalyst) in

Havana harbor, political pressures from the Democratic Party pushed the

government headed by President William McKinley, a Republican, into a

war McKinley had wished to avoid. Compromise proved impossible, resulting

in an ultimatum sent to Madrid, which was not accepted. First Madrid,

then Washington, formally declared war.

Although the main issue was Cuban independence, the ten-week war was

fought in both the Caribbean and the Pacific. A series of one-sided

American naval and military victories followed on all fronts, owing

to their numerical superiority in most of the battles and despite the

good performance of some of the Spanish infantry units. The outcome

was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, which was favorable to the U.S. followed

by temporary American control of Cuba and indefinite colonial authority

over Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines. The defeat and subsequent

end of the Spanish Empire was a profound shock for Spain's national

psyche. The victor gained several island possessions spanning the

globe and a rancorous new debate over the wisdom of imperialism.

Thus, (the United States gained there much wanted warm water ports

to extend their World Wide influences).

American interest in Caribbean

In 1823, the Monroe Doctrine stated that further efforts by

European governments to colonize land or interfere with states

in the Americas would not be accepted by the U.S., but Spain's

colony in Cuba was exempted. In 1890 Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan

wrote The Influence of Sea Power upon History, which credits the

rise of Britain to world power to the Royal Navy. Mahan’s ideas

on projecting strength through a strong navy had a powerful

worldwide influence, especially Japan. Theodore Roosevelt, later

Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President McKinley and an

aggressive supporter of a war with Spain over Cuba, was also strongly

influenced by Mahan’s conclusions. Americans had long been interested

in Cuba (and Hawaii), since several U.S. presidents offered to purchase

it from Spain (James Polk, Franklin Pierce and Ulysses S. Grant),

and others expressed their hopes of future annexation. 

Historians debate how much Americans were interested in obtaining

an empire, while noting that the European powers had in recent

decades dramatically expanded their empires, especially in Africa

and Asia. The United States seized this opportunity to become

an international empire themselves.

Thus, began the "gradual transformation" of the United States from

one of isolationism to one of internationalism.

"UT HISPANICUS CADIT, SIC OMNIS TERRA"

(As Spain falls, so falls the whole world)

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Swampyville's - You're the Poet - "Remember the Maine"
by Swamptown
Jun 27, 2011 | 338 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Swampyville's Ask the Politically Correct!

Question:

What was the Spanish/American War?

Politically Correct Resolution:

At the ending of the nineteenth century the United State's was a

sovereign nation that wanted to maintain this status.  It was

the internationalists that called it an "Isolationist" nation,

because it didn't want to get involved in overseas conflicts.

The Spanish/American War.

(Global Building)

(Wikipedia used for most of this article)

The Spanish–American War was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the

United States. Revolts against Spanish rule had been endemic for

decades in Cuba and were closely watched by Americans; there had

been war scares before.  By 1897–98 American public opinion grew angrier

at reports of Spanish atrocities, magnified by "yellow journalism". After

the mysterious sinking of the American battleship Maine (the Catalyst) in

Havana harbor, political pressures from the Democratic Party pushed the

government headed by President William McKinley, a Republican, into a

war McKinley had wished to avoid. Compromise proved impossible, resulting

in an ultimatum sent to Madrid, which was not accepted. First Madrid,

then Washington, formally declared war.

Although the main issue was Cuban independence, the ten-week war was

fought in both the Caribbean and the Pacific. A series of one-sided

American naval and military victories followed on all fronts, owing

to their numerical superiority in most of the battles and despite the

good performance of some of the Spanish infantry units. The outcome

was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, which was favorable to the U.S. followed

by temporary American control of Cuba and indefinite colonial authority

over Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines. The defeat and subsequent

end of the Spanish Empire was a profound shock for Spain's national

psyche. The victor gained several island possessions spanning the

globe and a rancorous new debate over the wisdom of imperialism.

Thus, (the United States gained there much wanted warm water ports

to extend their World Wide influences).

American interest in Caribbean

In 1823, the Monroe Doctrine stated that further efforts by

European governments to colonize land or interfere with states

in the Americas would not be accepted by the U.S., but Spain's

colony in Cuba was exempted. In 1890 Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan

wrote The Influence of Sea Power upon History, which credits the

rise of Britain to world power to the Royal Navy. Mahan’s ideas

on projecting strength through a strong navy had a powerful

worldwide influence, especially Japan. Theodore Roosevelt, later

Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President McKinley and an

aggressive supporter of a war with Spain over Cuba, was also strongly

influenced by Mahan’s conclusions. Americans had long been interested

in Cuba (and Hawaii), since several U.S. presidents offered to purchase

it from Spain (James Polk, Franklin Pierce and Ulysses S. Grant),

and others expressed their hopes of future annexation. 

Historians debate how much Americans were interested in obtaining

an empire, while noting that the European powers had in recent

decades dramatically expanded their empires, especially in Africa

and Asia. The United States seized this opportunity to become

an international empire themselves.

Thus, began the "gradual transformation" of the United States from

one of isolationism to one of internationalism.

"UT HISPANICUS CADIT, SIC OMNIS TERRA"

(As Spain falls, so falls the whole world)

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Swampyville's - "Remember the Maine"
by Swamptown
Jun 27, 2011 | 320 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Swampyville's Ask the Politically Correct!

Question:

What was the Spanish/American War?

Politically Correct Resolution:

At the ending of the nineteenth century the United State's was a

sovereign nation that wanted to maintain this status.  It was

the internationalists that called it an "Isolationist" nation,

because it didn't want to get involved in overseas conflicts.

The Spanish/American War.

(Global Building)

(Wikipedia used for most of this article)

The Spanish–American War was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the

United States. Revolts against Spanish rule had been endemic for

decades in Cuba and were closely watched by Americans; there had

been war scares before.  By 1897–98 American public opinion grew angrier

at reports of Spanish atrocities, magnified by "yellow journalism". After

the mysterious sinking of the American battleship Maine (the Catalyst) in

Havana harbor, political pressures from the Democratic Party pushed the

government headed by President William McKinley, a Republican, into a

war McKinley had wished to avoid. Compromise proved impossible, resulting

in an ultimatum sent to Madrid, which was not accepted. First Madrid,

then Washington, formally declared war.

Although the main issue was Cuban independence, the ten-week war was

fought in both the Caribbean and the Pacific. A series of one-sided

American naval and military victories followed on all fronts, owing

to their numerical superiority in most of the battles and despite the

good performance of some of the Spanish infantry units. The outcome

was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, which was favorable to the U.S. followed

by temporary American control of Cuba and indefinite colonial authority

over Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines. The defeat and subsequent

end of the Spanish Empire was a profound shock for Spain's national

psyche. The victor gained several island possessions spanning the

globe and a rancorous new debate over the wisdom of imperialism.

Thus, (the United States gained there much wanted warm water ports

to extend their World Wide influences).

American interest in Caribbean

In 1823, the Monroe Doctrine stated that further efforts by

European governments to colonize land or interfere with states

in the Americas would not be accepted by the U.S., but Spain's

colony in Cuba was exempted. In 1890 Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan

wrote The Influence of Sea Power upon History, which credits the

rise of Britain to world power to the Royal Navy. Mahan’s ideas

on projecting strength through a strong navy had a powerful

worldwide influence, especially Japan. Theodore Roosevelt, later

Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President McKinley and an

aggressive supporter of a war with Spain over Cuba, was also strongly

influenced by Mahan’s conclusions. Americans had long been interested

in Cuba (and Hawaii), since several U.S. presidents offered to purchase

it from Spain (James Polk, Franklin Pierce and Ulysses S. Grant),

and others expressed their hopes of future annexation. 

Historians debate how much Americans were interested in obtaining

an empire, while noting that the European powers had in recent

decades dramatically expanded their empires, especially in Africa

and Asia. The United States seized this opportunity to become

an international empire themselves.

Thus, began the "gradual transformation" of the United States from

one of isolationism to one of internationalism.

"UT HISPANICUS CADIT, SIC OMNIS TERRA"

(As Spain falls, so falls the whole world)

comments (0)
view/post comments
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